Gay Vilnius

Shiny, happy people don't hold hands. Not in Lithuania, not in public. And not in Vilnius, which has currently hosted more anti-gay demonstrations than tolerant ones. But maybe that's all about to change...

Above: Please insert image from 2007's gay pride rally in Vilnius. Oh, wait - there was none. (see comments)

Sixteen years after Lithuania liberated itself from Soviet shackles, the hardly-risque International Lesbian and Gay Association (ILGA) announced they will hold their annual European conference in Vilnius. In response to the news, an anti-homosexual demonstration was swiftly organised in September in an attempt to prevent such blasphemy. Well-known Lithuanian nationalists and many Catholic priests took part in the action in downtown Vilnius. One participant, speaking out against homosexuals, said, "Of course, they will soon organise a march in Vilnius and therefore we need to ensure in advance it will not be possible. While they are in their clubs we do not fight against them, they are not our enemies. However once they are on the streets, they are our enemies."

This opinion is more common than not in the Baltic countries where homophobia remains firmly entrenched, in contrast to Western Europe where gays and lesbians have become visible, if not fully accepted, members of society. Despite Lithuania's entry into the EU, gay visitors to Vilnius should not expect the same social acceptance as in most EU nations. Here, homosexuality is still soundly condemned by every major social institution from the government to the Church to the mass media. In August, the leading Lithuanian daily newspaper, Respublika, ran the headline, Who Rules the World? The answer, as the article would overtly explain, was gays and Jewish people. In fact, homophobic jokes and allusions are commonplace in Vilnius' press, where daily tabloid Vakaro Zinios ('The Evening News') routinely refers to gays as 'chickenpricks.' As in Poland, the Church has seen its conservative, family-oriented agenda continue to grow in support in Lithuania, an already 80% Catholic country. Perhaps the most shocking factoid came from a 2003 poll which revealed that 68% of Lithuanians would prefer to live next door to a drug dealer or convicted criminal than a homosexual.

Undoubtedly, this mentality is a Soviet souvenir. Under Stalin, after all, 'no one was homosexual' and 'sex did not exist.' Homosexuality was a crime (much more dangerous than drug-dealing apparently) and punished as such. Until 1993, it was still illegal to be homosexual in Lithuania, and the law was only then repealed because of pressure from the Council of Europe, which Lithuania was trying to join. This leftover from the Soviet legacy goes beyond the law, however, having wormed itself deep into the national psyche. Many older Lithuanians continue to view homosexuality as an illness. The government has officially labelled it a "perversion." This widespread and institutionalised homophobia makes it almost impossible for gay Lithuanians to reveal their sexual orientation (no Lithuanian celebrity or public figure has ever come out as openly gay). As a result, Vilnius' gay and lesbian community is rather small, with few people brave enough to speak about their orientation.

But things are improving. Young people are increasingly open to alternative lifestyles and gay travellers needn't worry (for the most part) about being pummeled on the streets. The underground community is beginning to grow and better organise itself. Local organisations like the Lithuanian Lesbian and Gay League (LLGL) have been quietly meeting and orchestrating sensitisation campaigns, seminars and debates for over a decade. But if you're a local, you'd hardly know. Meetings take place monthly in an unmarked apartment, so as not to incur the wrath of neighbours and others. That such an organisation - working towards the recognition and acceptance of gays in LT - is forced to operate with such extreme discretion speaks volumes about the current status of homosexuals in the country. Yet major breakthroughs are on the horizon.

In May 2007, Vilnius will cautiously host its first-ever gay pride event, Rainbow Days. As such, an effort must be made to ensure it's a safe enterprise for everyone. Consisting primarily of seminars, lectures and gatherings to distribute information over its ten days, the big-to-do will be May 25th's unfurling of an enormous rainbow flag in the centre of Vilnius. Regardless of public reaction to this event, the festival is a major step towards creating solidarity within Vilnius' gay and lesbian community, encouraging community awareness and slowing wearing down Lithuania's evasion of homosexual issues. The event is part of a gearing up for the ILGA's annual conference, slated for October 2007 in Vilnius. With Rainbow Days as a primer for the conference, local and European organisations should have a better idea of how ready and willing Lithuania is to face the gay skeleton in its closet, and how best to support its 'coming out.'

For gay travellers to Vilnius, the city has scant offerings in terms of gay-friendly nightlife, with only one official gay club (perhaps the only in all of Lithuanian), but it's a doozy. A sprawling underground free-for-all of forbidden pleasures, Men's Factory may do more for Vilnius' gay cause than any other local organisation. Certainly unmatched as a meeting/mingling point, Men's Factory has proven that there is an active, growing homosexual community in Vilnius. Notorious a few years ago, things have either settled down a bit or the shock value has worn off. Still, Men's Factory is titillating, harmless fun Wednesday through Saturday - and you don't have to be gay to go (but that's the incentive). With it's strange industrial arachnid decor abounding with phalluses, Men's Factory offers multiple rooms, some geared toward men, others for lesbians, several for dancing (on- or off-stage), and a plethora for more carnal indescretions. In fact, private apartments are available in the club for hourly rental. Can't get much more blatantly accommodating than that. The music is more thumping techno than flamboyant pop, making it more palatable for most clubbers, and its discreet location outside the centre supports it as a safe, secure environment for reckless fun. The entrance fee is not cheap, but doesn't seem to inhibit droves of people from filling the place.

If you know of other particularly gay-friendly places in Vilnius, please let us know; and feel free to post your comments about gay Vilnius on this page below. We encourage different viewpoints and want to hear your thoughts about the gay cause in Vilnius. For more information about pro-gay organisations and events in Lithuania, visit www.gayline.lt. For the most comprehensive guide of gay events, organisations and community news in English, as well as personals and chat rooms, visit www.gay.lt. Visit www.atviri.lt to join the effort against homophobia and employment discrimination in Lithuania.

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Ferdinando from Italy Reply Dec 15th, 2013

Per he' in Lituania tanti problemi e poi in giro per Italian in autostrada nei percheggi troviamo camionisti Che si lasciano fare Di tutto da noi Gay e' gorse Che a Casa logo Hanno Laura poi quanto sono fluoride del loro territorial fanno tutto CIO Che non pls sono fare in Lituania a UDINE nel parcheggio Della dogma a al sabato sera e Dominica dove parcheggio no si fa Di tutto e dipiu' basta dare loro barre e works poi ti fanno saltire sul Camion e li fai con Lui CIO Che tu voi allograft mi domanda se lomosessualita' non e' accept tats in Lituania per he' quanto sono fluoride del loro territorio fanno tutto e si se to contenti e liberati dal loro modo Di vendere ... CIO fratello presente agli amici Della Lituania ...

Agne Reply Sep 1st, 2013

why do you need to be proud of man by having sex with another man or woman with another woman? sex is private thing, so it is okay for you to do it in private, nobody needs to know it. Because you guys are not able to create families, stay in silence, do not make bad influence for children like its normal, it is not.

Barry from Ireland Oct 13th, 2013

If it is the poor children you speak about is your main Concern . What about the many who are Gay or bi or many more who are straight and have dabbled as young people Everywher do ! They Were Children and Children of today will be them ! Worry about you own personal life not others

Agne Reply Sep 1st, 2013

oh Dear God, why do you let this nature failure to flourish?

Jeff from United States Reply Jul 10th, 2013

Just when you think Americans take the cake for being homophobic then you go to Lithuania and find out there are people more stupid and Americans.....My partner is Lithuanian and god for bid his family or village find out he is gay...they could/would kill him and it would be totally acceptable. Sad world we live....What has the Catholic Church done to these poor soles?

pedro from Uruguay Reply Apr 23rd, 2013

good, i hate any kind of discrimination. i am proud we in uruguay legalized equal marriage one month ago. i am not gay ,but have tons of lgbtqq friends. they live free and happy in uruguay. not surprissed of homophobia in lithuania...don t care, it will change. i poland i didn see any homophobic act. i really was ssurprised by the fascist anti equal marriage in paris! good travels, and happy life for everyone, except fascists, and people who hates people.

Raul from Azerbaijan Reply May 18th, 2012

Well,i am living in Vilnius already for a year,and i like it here! Yes,there are racist people,homophobic etc. However,i wear what i want and i do proud of being gay,and noone says anything against me or my orientation! and people are really friendly,well i am loving Lithuania:)

Dominykas from United Kingdom Reply Aug 22nd, 2011

People, I do advise not to show off in anyway, cuz it's the city I was born in and do believe me when I say it's one of the most racist cities in the world when it comes to exposing yourself. Don't wear anything to flashy or colorful ; no fashion victims on the streets or anything alike. I am not kidding I know the place really well. Soho club after London's venues feels like a Soviet Union's basement club for old pervs to b honest and Men's factory is not a gay club anymore. Basically there's no gay scene in Vilnius what so ever ... So just be careful

Jonas Bay from Norway Reply Aug 2nd, 2011

I am visiting Vilnius next week. Can someone tell me about Soho? Is it a big club or what? I just checked out theire web site, but the photos was really bad, just small with 1 or 2 persons. And how about Mens factory, is it open or closed?

kma from United States Reply Jul 8th, 2011

Someone from Vilnius, Lithuania? He liked to establish knowledge with someone who lives in Vilnius, Lithuania. I go there a few days next week! Young boys or girls, and have not problems of friendship and / or follow up with a male sixty years old!..

Jeff from United States Reply Jul 4th, 2011

I'm dating a guy from Lithuania and trust everything they say in this article is true. I feel for his as he has yet accepted the fact that gay people don't have to live in fear. I feel sorry for our brothers in the Baltic countries....

Vytoldas from Lithuania Reply May 24th, 2011

Yes, you will! :}

Sebastien Boucher from Canada Reply Apr 7th, 2011

Visiting Vilnius in June. I'll be at Soho bar on Saturday June 11th. Am I going to have fun?

tadas from Lithuania Reply Apr 5th, 2011

well... I haven't encountered any homophobic act against me in my life. not a long life (23), but still... Most of my friends know about me and they are ok with it... there are some angry people but they are everywhere in the world. for me everything is fine.

to reviewed for me from Poland Reply Jan 24th, 2011

You're surprised? Lithuania passed a horrible law about "homosexual propaganda". Almost all MPs were pro and there wasn't any manifestations against. I can't imagine something like that in Poland, even some our MPs sent protests to Lithuanian parliament and in a front of Lithuanian Embassy in Warsaw there was a demonstration against this law.

to mateusz from United Kingdom Reply Jan 14th, 2011

polish guy just said its a shame to have such neighbor as Lithuania. :DDDDD

Fantastic from France Reply Dec 21st, 2010

SOHO club in Vilnius is now the only gay club in the capital of Lithuania, and it is higly recommended. A pleasant and welcoming atmosphaere, good bar facilityes, great service, good large dance floor. Shifting DJ´s, sometimes drag show, and show with even some big names from the show/entertainment business nationaly and internationaly. Open from 22 - 06 Thursdays until Sundays, (Sundays and Thursdays closing a bit earlier). Friendly price level. A lot of young handsome people, mostly gay and bisexual boys and mens, in addition som lesbian girls an dwimens, and some one who has not desided yet, or are curiouse for what they want. Easy to make contacts. Safe atmosphaere with a splendid staff taking good care.

Mateusz from Poland Reply Nov 24th, 2010

In Poland we're ashamed becuase of homophobia in Lithuania. In Warsaw we elected the first openly gay member of the City Council this year :) It's a shame to have such neighbour as Lithuania :(

Peter from United Kingdom Reply Aug 3rd, 2010

Please be assured, that gay people, along with their straight friends, will never stop fighting for equality and for the realisation that it is not a bad thing to love someone of the same sex. We will prevail.

Arthie from Brazil Reply Aug 1st, 2010

I`m visiting Vilnius next March/11 and I hope to see good gay life in the city

Rocky from Lithuania Reply Jul 24th, 2010

It's our pride to be normal. So gays, get out to Warsaw, please!

Mateusz from Poland Reply Jul 23rd, 2010

I saw Gay Pride in Vilnius and it was very strange - small, shy demonstration with most foreign people (also with Polish supporters) looking like a protest of workers of a supermarket. In Warsaw was Europride and it was great with about 10 000 participians, funny clothes, drag queens, handsome shirtless men and thousands of ordinary Poles with kids watching parade on all route, smiling and taking photos. Right-wing hooligans were about 300 and they weren't able to disturb the parade. Comapring to Vilnius, Warsaw is a heaven for gays. Lthuania, it's your shame!

.. from Lithuania Reply Jul 7th, 2010

I'm not trying to justify those shouting against gays but our society is as it is. If we try to remember what we are usually exposed to in terms of gay culture is gay sex. I do not deny that there exists pure love, friendship, tenderness or that gay people feel the same heterosexuals do. However, what I often encounter in gay culture is sex cult. It's not that homosexual love is disgusting or abnormal, it is the scenes we tend to associate with it. I have personally encountered an unpleasant scene in sauna when a young family with children were forced to leave because gay couple were almost having sex there taking no regard of the others. I mean, such conduct is highly improper not only for heterosexuals but also for homosexuals, and I wouldn't be happy to see the heterosexual couple mating somewhere near. In such situations, one cannot help but think that gays demand more than heterosexuals. Even having a couple of gay friends, I do not feel they are worse or better just because of being gay. Their sexuality does not concern me and should not concern the rest of the world, and I'm happy that they are happy being honest loving people but I do not feel it right to let them ignore certain society rules just because they are gay. Coming from Lithuania, I do feel the public opposition towards homosexuality as such; nevertheless, I understand that two different sets of values are juxtaposed: the concept of personal freedom to live decently and traditional family values which the image of homosexuality does not promote. In my opinion, neither of these values are absolute, thus each person privately decides what side one is on. The society is not perfect, but it has certain rules that any person has to commit to, regardless of one's sexual orientation. While the society is very complex and diverse, the questions to ask is what homosexuals want to demonstrate by marching in the streets, and whether it is effective in changing the attitude homophobes.

Pawel from Poland Reply May 13th, 2010

I recently visited Vilnius, which is the city where my family used to live for generations. I must say I was surprised at how widespread homophobia is, and how hot is the hatred. I live in Poland, in a rather small city of Torun. And people think Poland is homophobic... honestly I don;t know what would I call Lithuania. What you hear from people is so backwards and mindblowing... I'm gay. In Poland vast majority doesn;t give a flying toss about someone's orientation. And many people are outright supportive. There are many bigoted people in Poland, but it is vary rare to see someone confrontational or hot with hatred. Homophobia in Poland shows most in gossiping behind someone's back. In Vilnius people actually get red and shaking when you ask about gay clubs. When you ask about human rights for gay people. Polish minority in Lithuania is not any different. Vilnius looks good on postcards. Lots of bad emotions in people, very bad place to visit. Don't bother and go to Berlin. Or even to Warsaw, with its vibrant gay scene.

holaamigo from Argentina Reply Mar 19th, 2010

VIVAN LOS HOMBRES QUE LE GUSTAN LOS HOMBRES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Mateusz from Poland Reply Jan 14th, 2010

Visit Warsaw, or Cracow and don't bother about stupid Lithuanians. In Poland now Kaczyñski's brothers don't rule and we think that homophobia sucks.

.. from Lithuania Reply Dec 3rd, 2009

aikit jus visi nx pyderastu galvos kurva!!! :D:D:D

robbie from Belgium Reply Nov 16th, 2009

After reading some of these nasty naf comments that have come from lithuania I have come up with a great idea why dont all of those from villinus and the rest of the country pack up your bags and piss off home, you comeinto the rest of europe and claim as much money as possible and tell people here how fab your country is, well if its that great go home to your sad little world. I bet when you are looking for work or claiming your dole you dont care if a gay man is employing you or paying your benifit or wages . Double standards and if you feel that strongly about GAYS pull out of europe, Oh and give up the money you get from it NO NEVER so either get with it OR SHUT UP. ps please dont send any more here THANKS

mik from United Kingdom Reply Oct 28th, 2009

just had sex with straight guy for 200litas, so no coment more

Crack from Poland Reply Oct 10th, 2009

i guess that gays have more problems in Uk. a lot of countries in western europe r so not tolerant and racist. fortunatelly i live in central europe i mean in poland here nobody care who is sleeping in ur bad. ohhh welcome to all normal and tolerant ppl in POLAND :) i hate nazis from germany uk and holland go to hell pussis

Love from United Kingdom Reply Jul 23rd, 2009

How funny when people say 'gays are not welcome in Vilnus' because gay people are already there...they could be your doctor, your tacher, the person who cleans your house or rules the country. gay people are everywhere. Vilnus will change, as did the rest of the world when they realsied that gay people are just the same as everyone else. So, dont waste your time shouting at gay people..because we are here...we are queer and you had better get used to it. We are not afraid to fight for our rights...so bring it on!

Dawn from Lithuania Reply Jun 7th, 2009

This is so out of date. I mean, Mens Factory. Check out Soho. There's one more club at Jaksto street. There are also a few places in Klaipeda. The rest of the story is pretty well told. Unfortunately.

V from Lithuania Reply Jun 5th, 2009

haha one of my american friends said "i tolerate gays while it doesn't bother me but if i'm forced to see them - it already bothers me". seriously i met a number of perverts around the world an i can say most of them r ok to talk or work with, but, man, that's totally disgusting what they actually do and are. this doesn't make me beat or kill them, though... however i'm straight but i'm not trying to explicitly express my sexuality only for making other people's day f*n bad :( that is what makes me sick of them :) frankly, what do you think, if you write gayish comments here, won't there be more tourists in Vilnius who are sick of perverts, than there would be gays and their supporters overall?

Adrian from United Kingdom Reply May 4th, 2009

gAngster says it all. You are a narrow minded biggot. Gay people are and have been some of the kindest and most thoughtful people I have met. Sadly gAngster you will never have an insight to the charecter of those you choose to condemn because you are a nazi idiot. News for you dude, we all have to share this planet and if we can eradicate the views of people like you then this would be a better place to live. OPEN that pathetic closed mind of yours and face embrace reality and the very lovely people and MY friends that are gay and thank god for them and the added diversity of life. By the way , I am stright but maintain an open mind and dislike nazi and narrow minded idiots like you. ps We do not want the likes of you in the UK iether.

GAngster from Lithuania Reply Apr 1st, 2009

Are you fucking crazy.In Lithuania we hate gays dont can think you are welcome here and dont say that we like you.

Anes from Netherlands Reply Jan 10th, 2009

accept the gay people. everybody who dusn't doesn't deserve to live on this planet

Paul from United Kingdom Reply Jan 8th, 2009

Well I'm shocked by some peoples hateful comments on here, There is nothing wrong with being gay. Homosexuality has been around as long as Hetrosexuality so get over it!! Its good to have a diverse population and some of the worlds greatest people have been gay! This is 2009 and it seems some people are stuck in the middle ages. I hate Bigots and Homophobes! You all cause so much trouble in this world! get a life and grow up!

sara from United States Reply Nov 18th, 2008

okay first id like to say, danggg, go kurt and andrew w you guys know what youre talking about haha but really, nothing is wrong with gay ppl a gay guy is a girls best friend, they make great shopping buddies lmao but me myself, being bi, have been through discrimination just like im sure every other gay/lesbian/ bi/transexual or anything like that and it really hurts to be discriminated like that which is what a lot od ppl dont relize unless theyve lived though it but maybe thats just my opinion.

unknown from United States Reply Oct 7th, 2008

i think being gay is fine ( im emo )

? from United States Reply Oct 4th, 2008

I wish people would wake up if ure christan or religious then read God made man and woman to have children to give birth to life like the earth but rite now we are killing the earth but we are supposed to be the keepers of earth u are supposed to love everyone no matter who or wat they are if u dont then God can hate u if u hate this then i can i hate u an eye for eye basically the only thing that homosexuals are doing wrong is not giving life thats all if u have sex for fun thats lust which is a sin u have sex for the creation of children this is my point not ures so believe eat u want to believe

cockmeatsandwich from United States Reply Sep 19th, 2008

well i dont care about gay people, its not like they hit on any random dude, theyre basically chicks in their own mind, except they have dicks lol aslong as they dont say anything to me, i dont care about them and them getting married, its not like just because its ok to be gay, im gonna go gay, no way, im all about pussy anyways goodluck to you all

Kurt from Canada Reply Aug 27th, 2008

First off, shame on anyone who has posted hateful anti-gay comments on here. The world is a diverse place, and we cannot label neither heterosexuals nor homosexuals as "normal" (I'm talking to you, princeedward and anouminous) No one is "supposed" to like anyone! People like who they like, it's called a "sexual PREFERENCE". Being lesbian is fine. Being gay is fine. Being straight is fine. Being bisexual is fine. Being pansexual IS FINE. Some people may view homosexual acts as disgusting, some may not. Just because you would not personally do such things does not give you anything close to the right to condemn the homosexual community. I could say "I hate straight people because I think the idea of having sex with a woman is disgusting because I would never put my penis in a vagina. Penis is meant to be put in ass." but that sounds silly, now doesn't it? (Note: I don't actually think penis is meant to be put into any specific hole) It's the same thing when you say, "I hate gay people because I think it's digusting to have sex with a man because I would never put my penis in an ass. Penis is supposed to go into vagina." Really, open your eyes those of you who haven't yet. The world is a changing place. P.S: What's so bad about not having any "normal" people? In a world where there were only gay and lesbian people (not even bisexuals) children would still be born. Sperm donors would exist. People would still want children, it would just be a bit different than what many families do in this reality. End post.

carlos jr. castro from United States Reply Aug 14th, 2008

hi my name is carlos i live in parker az. im bi. im proun\d of it too.. i have a million of green tumbs.

Julio from Belgium Mar 10th, 2013

and what is your point bro?

carlos jr. casrto from United States Reply Aug 14th, 2008

i think showing my sexuality is greatt. ilove rainbows!!!!!!!!! and i live in parker az.

Andrew W from United Kingdom Reply Jul 19th, 2008

I am a gay man and have visited LT, and am aware that Lithuania is a homophobic country. Then again, which country in Europe is not? My own country certainly is. I am aware that not all Lithuanians are homophobic. Many Lithuanians who have worked in the UK, where LGBT people are more accepted, have worked with gays, noticed they are no different to straights, and lost their homophobic opinions. I did not experience homophobia in LT. However, my friend (who is straight and lives in Klaipeda) advised that it is not a good idea for two men to sit close together in a nightclub, in case someone assumes they are an "item". This situation, although it might appear trivial to a westerner, is not any different to what exists in the less enlightened parts of England. When I grew up in England, homophobia was more common than now. We (LGBT people of the UK) have achieved much since then, and still have a long way to go. I am sure that my sexuality was obvious to many Lithuanians, especially to women, but they did not comment. Either they were being hospitable (which in the case of Lithianians, is a "given") or they were not bothered. I am sure that the situation will improve but it will need more LGBT Lithuanians to come out about their sexuality. Anyway I have one issue with the article and that is the use of the term "alternative lifestyle". Being lesbian, gay, bi or trans is NOT a "lifestyle". We are born this way, in the same way that a black person is born black and a woman is born female.

Marco from Netherlands Reply Jun 27th, 2008

I wish all people in Lithuania well. Good luck to those of you who strive for equal rights for gays and lesbians. It takes courage to stick out your neck in a situation like this. I hope for a future society where all can live free without fear.

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mantas from Lithuania Reply Apr 28th, 2008

i am very ashamed of this situation. though there are lots of people in lithuania who think gay/lesb is illnes or such. and well, i honestly dont know what there to be done...

gene g from United States Reply Apr 18th, 2008

People life is short, too short. Poor is the man/woman, who's pleasures depend on the permission of another. ...And for the people who hate being who they are, wake up fools. ;-) Nobody is really 100% straight, cause no one is perfect.

jbpatricia from United States Reply Apr 17th, 2008

ando buscando a mi media naranja soy muy enamorada me gusta las rumbas y detodo

anouminus from United States Reply Apr 5th, 2008

i dont like gays thats all i have tyo say but if ur gay den i dun know wats ur frikin problem ur supposed to like women not men

princeedward from Canada Reply Feb 28th, 2008

I have nothing again gay. or -l. but i think gay and lesbian want to make a bigger population of there community .And there will be times like there won't be normal people.

Casey from United States Reply Feb 17th, 2008

I believe we are all equal. We should be able to marry and have just as much say so as any straight couple. We are no different than they. I graduated early with the highest GPA available at my school. Everyone wanted to make fun of me for being a nerd but that only pushed me more. I'm tired of the bashing. It's time we took charge of our lives and not be afraid to do something or say something. Especially when they don't have to be. It's time that a new power arose. The Gay Power.

quise from United States Reply Jan 25th, 2008

GAY POWER !!!!!!

moey from United Kingdom Reply Jan 23rd, 2008

Well im staright and i dont really see what all the fuss is about we are all equal so what if gays disgusting i agree that they are but we all need 2 just get along

Vilnius Life from Lithuania Reply Jan 21st, 2008

After a January 16th announcement, the Lithuanian Government now faces censure over three breaches of the European Convention of Human Rights concerning gay issues in the past year. These breaches included Vilnius major, Juozas Imbrasas, urging bus drivers to protest buses featuring pro-gay adverts, then the government wouldn’t let the EU’s “anti-discrimination truck” from parking at a gay-inclusive equality event, and finally, the city refused to permit the International Lesbian and Gay Association’s annual European conference. Three strikes and you're out?

.. sparky_darren_leeds from United Kingdom Reply Jan 18th, 2008

looking for stevieG bell me... write me .. and we'll pick up where you left off.. sparky_darren_leeds..... ps i want my shorts back ... 07836566933

dfgsodjfipsjdf from Albania Reply Jan 15th, 2008

RAINBOWS!!!!!!!!!!

breeziebethany from Algeria Reply Jan 15th, 2008

I believe in a perfect society where gays can express their homosexuality, whithout being judged for it. where gays can walk down the street just like everyone else. and have unicorns and rainbows everywhere. Just like me and my girlfriend. and yes I'am too a girl.

Adam from United Kingdom Reply Nov 2nd, 2007

THere is one religious community in Lithuania who are accepting of gay people-Pagans. Despite Paganism being older than Catholism in Lithuania and followed by about 10% of population, the catholic church blocked a move by the parlaiment to officially recognise Romuva( the baltic pagan belief) as a national official religion.

Vilnius Life from Lithuania Reply Oct 29th, 2007

On October 26th 2007, the International Lesbian Gay Association (ILGA) was barred from holding a public rally for sexual tolerance by the mayor (again). Hours later the meeting room the ILGA gathered in was filled with gas after smoke bombs were thrown into the room. For more details find the link above in Bonus Life.

alexader from United States Reply Sep 28th, 2007

i a m not proud of who i am , i feel disgusted of being gay...i feel like nothing...it is not good like this fuck love,fuck gay life i wish don't be part od this nigtmare

SteveMD2 from United States Reply Sep 2nd, 2007

It is quite obvious that communism and fascism haven't been ended. Why - because the greatest lie of all - the Catholic Church, has embraced them. They, along with the Islamic extremists belong in the dustbin of history.

Skip from United States Reply Jun 25th, 2007

Gay rights activists and organizers are vilified in Catholic Vilnius; meanwhile, largely Catholic Mexico has legalized same sex marriage and Brazilian megapolis San Paolo hosted the world's largest pride event with over three million participants in early June. The greatest changes on the GLBT front are occurring in Catholic Latin America, while strongly Catholic Poland and Lithuania continue to persecute their gay minorities. Upon joining the EU, Eastern Europe seems unable to join the New World. How long will the EU let Eastern European countries demonstrate discrimination towards their minorities?

Vilnius Life from Lithuania Reply May 31st, 2007

Not long after this page was written, Vilnius major, Juozas Imbrasas, supported bus drivers who refused to drive buses with pro-sexual tolerance slogans on them and then banned the EU's 'tolerance truck' from entering the city, essentially sinking the Rainbow Days festival last weekend. Rainbow Days would have been LT's first gay pride event, but was cancelled at the behest of the major and her program of protecting homophobes rather than sexual minorities. Get the full story from the links on the right...

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